Easy Gluten Free Flour Tortilla Recipe

Easy Gluten Free Flour Tortilla Recipe

“I need a great gluten free flour tortilla recipe!” is a request I hear nearly every week, so I’m happy to share with all my readers my easy, inexpensive, guaranteed to please, 4-ingredient gluten free flour tortilla recipe!

Luckily I’ve also had tons of readers tell me that they’ve tried my gluten free flour tortilla recipe and they’re in love (the sign of a great recipe, for sure!).

my gluten free miami gluten free tortillas with gfJules

Amanda from My Gluten Free Miami loves to make these gluten free flour tortillas with my gfJules Flour. Click the photo for Amanda’s recipe for gluten free chicken tacos with these yummy tortillas!

 

Amanda from My Gluten Free Miami has made this recipe several times with my gfJules Flour:

One of the things I missed most when going gluten free was flour tortillas…If you saw my shredded chicken tacos or bbq pork tacos, you saw these soft, flexible beauties in the photos. I’d love to claim credit for the recipe, but I got it from @gfjules and they are so good! Slightly time intensive, but totally worth it. I use a bowl to get that round shape.

While not a traditional “bread”, gluten free flour tortillas can be used in place of bread as a sandwich wrap (think lunch boxes, people!), or of course as a traditional tortilla in Mexican dishes … like these gluten free burritos with guacamole dressing!

gluten free veggie burritos with avocado -gfJules

I wistfully remember my pre-gluten free days of eating out at Mexican restaurants and requesting extra flour tortillas just to pull apart and eat on their own.

gluten free flour tortilla -gfJules

Soft, pliable homemade gluten free flour tortillas.

 

Of course, gluten free corn tortillas are a great thing to have on hand for that emergency gluten free quesadilla craving, but you can make those with soft gluten free flour tortillas, too!

gluten free quesadilla with avocado

Gluten free quesadilla made with gluten free flour tortillas in place of corn tortillas.

 

And corn tortillas are no substitute for a soft, pliable gluten free flour tortilla in recipes where you really need to W-R-A-P the tortilla around your fillings.

gluten free veggie burritos with homemade gluten free flour tortillas

No ordinary corn tortilla is soft enough to wrap around burrito fillings.

 

Happily, none of us has to crave these wraps in vain any longer! Once you try this recipe for yourself and see just how easy it is to make these gluten free flour tortillas, you’ll want to keep a stash of extras for anytime munching.

gluten free tortilla stack

Here’s how to make these yummy tortillas:

First, make the dough as directed below in my recipe using either a food processor or a pastry cutter. After allowing the dough to sit wrapped for 30 minutes to absorb all the liquid, you simply roll out on a counter or mat dusted with more of my non-gritty gfJules Flour.

gluten free tortilla rolled out

Be sure not to roll too thin because although the dough will stretch and let you roll it thin, if it’s too thin, the dough will crack and break after it’s cooked.

Cook in an un-oiled skillet or frying pan until it begins to puff up …

gluten free tortilla

… then flip it to the other side, cooking only until the other side lightly browns, usually less than 1 minute more.

gluten free tortilla cooked

And voila! You have a stack of delicious, soft and fresh homemade gluten free flour tortillas!

gluten free tortilla stack

You could even use this recipe to make your own nacho chips for dipping or for dessert nachos, in this recipe from This Vivacious Life!

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Easy Gluten Free Flour Tortilla Recipe

gluten free flour tortillas

4 from 9 reviews

  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes + 30 minutes rest
  • Cook Time: 4 minutes each
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 8 tortillas

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the gfJules™ flour, salt and shortening in a food processor, pulsing until it is evenly distributed and is a fine meal consistency. (You may do this by hand by incorporating the shortening into the dry ingredients with two butter knives or a pastry blender).

Turning the food processor back on, slowly pour the water through the feeding tube until the dough forms a nice ball. You may need slightly more or less water to achieve this consistency.

Divide and pat the dough into 8 equal-sized discs (45-50 grams each) or 4 larger discs (90-100 grams each). Set aside on a plate and wrap in clear plastic wrap. Let sit for approximately 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare your filling for fajitas, burritos, sandwiches, or whatever you prefer.

After 30 minutes, preheat a griddle or large skillet to medium-high heat (do not oil the surface). Roll each disc individually on a clean surface or pastry mat dusted well with gfJules™ All Purpose Flour. This dough is capable of being rolled extremely thinly without breaking, but keep it a bit thicker to prevent the edges from crisping and cracking when cooking the tortillas. Imagine the thickness of a traditional flour tortilla and roll to that thickness, but no more.

Roll in different directions to make the tortillas round. If you are unsatisfied with the roundness of your tortillas, you can always lay a paper plate gently on top and cut a circle around to form even edges.

Lift each tortilla gently using your rolling pin or a spatula to transfer the tortillas one at a time to the hot cooking surface. Only cook the tortillas for a very short time, so watch for when the tortilla starts to bubble with air, then flip to the other side to cook for a few seconds only – cook less than you would think you need. It doesn’t hurt to overcook the tortillas slightly, but the edges will become crispy and make rolling a bit more challenging.

When done, place tortillas on a towel-lined plate and wrap each in layers of the towel until ready to serve; if serving much later, layer between pieces of wax paper and seal the tortillas in the towel inside a zip-top bag once cooled.

To reheat later, leave the tortillas in the towel and microwave briefly on medium-low heat.

Now, wasn’t that easy?

So what’s stopping you from having soft, fresh, homemade gluten free flour tortillas anytime you like?

Pin for later!

Homemade gluten free tortillas: soft and delicious with gfJules!

Homemade gluten free flour tortillas that are soft and pliable like they oughta be! Made with soft and stretchy gfJules Flour, they wrap around your burritos and roll out like a dream! (Don't try this recipe with store-bought rice flour or bean flour based blends, or you'll just be disappointed). | gfJules.com #glutenfree #vegan #nutfree #yeastfree #tortilla

gluten free flour tortilla tutorial pin

Gluten free flour tortillas can be as soft & pliable as you remember -- IF you don't make them with store-bought rice-based flour. gfJules to the rescue!

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169 thoughts on “Easy Gluten Free Flour Tortilla Recipe

  1. Hi there. I feel like I know you since I’ve followed you for so long, but I wonder if you have a carb and/or sugar count on your flour tortillas versus a regular tortilla?

    I’m trying these tortillas today (they’re resting now!) and my husband is diabetic, so he won’t eat them if they’re not lower. He rarely eats a burrito any more and they used to be a staple for both of us!

  2. I may have missed it, but can these be stored and used days later? My kids eat up a lot of tortillas and I’m wondering if this is something I could make a large batch of to use over a course of several days. Thanks!!

    • Hi – yes, you can absolutely store them and keep using them. Once cooled, I put them in a zip top bag and store on the counter, then warm to use again. They also work well to freeze them. Enjoy!
      ~jules

  3. Do you have Celiacs Disease or was this a fad diet and thought, hey let’s make some DOUGH while I’m at it? Corn tortillas?????? Corn!!! What are you thinking?
    So, you haven’t done your research and didn’t state the importance that corn makes us just as sick and to avoid it just like gluten. Disappointing!

    • Hi Heidi, not sure what you’re talking about. I’m sorry you are disappointed in my recipe, but doesn’t sound like you tried it? My gluten free flour tortilla recipe is a substitute for corn tortillas so we don’t have to use corn tortillas. Maybe you didn’t read through the whole recipe? Anyway, give a look through my site and you’ll find loads of other recipes and articles on living gluten free and choosing healthy but delicious gluten free options. The only corn I use in my products is non-GMO and of course is gluten free (first priority!), just so you know. And to answer your question, yes, I have celiac disease. All the best,
      ~jules

  4. It’s not that easy. The rest of the meal was done and I was still fighting to make this work. The tortillas would crumble apart in chunks. Very frustrating.

  5. These photos say it all. These incredibly easy to make gluten free tortillas are SO wonderful. We just make up a big batch and use them for a few days, freezing the rest to have on hand in a pinch. They never disappoint! We really love your flour Jules!

    • Oh Monica, that’s so great to hear! I’m thrilled to hear that your family loves these and my gfJules Flour! Thanks for taking the time to let me know!
      ~jules

  6. Pingback: Gluten Free Sweet Potato Black Bean Burger Recipe - vegan & gluten free

  7. Pingback: Gluten Free Sweet Potato Black Bean Burger Recipe - Gluten free recipes - gfJules - with the REAL Jules

    • Hi Adrienne, you could use olive oil but you need to make sure it is worked into the flour in the same way so there are lots of little balls of the oil in flour like a pebbly mix. Try it and see how you like it that way -they may tend to be a bit denser without the shortening.
      ~jules

  8. Instead of rolling them by hand, can I use a tortilla press? Mine is currently sitting and gathering dust and I’d love to put it back into good use. (No gluten on it as I always put plastic baggies over it when making my own flour tortillas, years ago, but it’ll get a thorough cleaning before. Just in case.) Thanks much! I’ve always had good luck with your recipes, even when I sub out a different flour blend. Looking forward to not having multiple blends left in my house.

    • Hi Sarah, I’ve heard from others that the tortilla press works well with this recipe and my flour, so go for it! I’d love to hear how it goes!
      ~jules

      • I FINALLY got around to these and made them using my tortilla press and they worked quite well with parchment paper on either side of the press and a rolling pin to transfer to my cast iron tortilla skillet. I learned that my balls of 8 needed to be about 3/4 the size to make them as thin as I preferred. Instead of shortening, I used regular butter. I also think I grabbed the wrong flour blend (oops!) because they were a tad grainy and required more water (both of which are standard issues I have with the particular blend I grabbed). They were still quite delicious, so no complaints there. Can’t wait to make them with the correct flour!!! Hahahahaha!

        • Thanks so much for coming back to leave a comment and telling me how it went! Butter will definitely make a difference but yes, the wrong flour blend will make a total difference! I can’t wait to hear how you like these using my gfJules flour with no grit!
          ~jules

    • Hi Jen – next time don’t refrigerate. That might have made the dough more dense. Let me know how it goes next go around!
      ~jules

  9. Gave this recipe a try but used Bob’s Red Mill Cup for Cup flour. I’ve made regular flour tortillas and always usee baking powder. I think it would’ve helped this recipe.

    • There’s definitely a difference when you don’t use my gfJules Flour. Good to know that using another blend, baking powder would help. My gfJules Flour is finer and lighter, so it’s not needed. Thanks for the feedback, Cindy!
      ~jules

  10. Sadly I’m very sensitive to corn so cannot use your flour any longer! Is it non GMO organic? Maybe after being off all corn for a year I can continue to use your flour that’s in my pantry! Love your corn bread mix too!

    • Hi Sue, all the flours that go into my gfJules Flour blend and my mixes (including cornbread) are non-GMO, but only some are organic. I hope you’ll be able to use them again soon, as well. Just so you know, my gfJules Sandwich Bread Mix is now corn-free! Hope that helps you enjoy it even sooner!
      ~jules

    • Hi Christina, no, my gfJules Flour is top-8 allergen-free, so it contains NO nuts, dairy or soy. In fact, none of my mixes contain any of those or the other top 8 Food Allergens. I hope that helps you enjoy great baking again!
      ~jules

    • Hi Desiree, I do keep several in my freezer in a bag at all times. I thaw gently, wrapped, in the microwave or oven. They’re great!
      ~jules

  11. Hi Jules
    Would you happen to have GF Norwegian lefse recipe? They are kind of like tortillas

    Any help would be appreciated

    • Hi Maribeth – great question! I don’t have the ideal lefse griddle, so I haven’t made them yet. HOWEVER, I have customers tell me that they just sub in my gfJules Flour and their old family lefse recipe and it turns out beautifully! Let me know if you try – I’d love to make them one day myself!
      ~jules

      • Omg someone please give me a lefse recipe! I’ve been asking my grandma for so many years our family recipe and for whatever reason she keeps refusing to give it to me just hands me the lefsa at Christmas, which now makes me sick because of how badly gluten messes me up i can’t help but take a bite at least lol more than a bite and i end up in the er though so it’s pretty risky for me. Fyi to another person who wrote in, non gmo corn is perfectly fine and corn itself has many health benefits. Also, celiac disease isn’t the ONLY disease that is severely affected by gluten. That kind of comment really pisses me off honestly i hate it when people are ignorant and don’t know what they’re talking about. I have multiple sclerosis, rhumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis, all of which are devastated by eating any gluten at all. Celiac isn’t the ONLY disease to have intestinal damage causing a gluten and dairy intolerance. I can’t have gluten or dairy at ALL anymore and I’m constantly getting nagged by people like that telling me if i don’t have celiac then I’m just doing it for a for a diet fad but they clearly don’t know what they’re talking about. They usually don’t even know what gluten really is and how it works. It’s a protein that is created when agitating flour enough with the right chemical reactions. It’s not just sitting there in the flour. It has to be agitated. That’s why in Europe like in Italy for instance, most of their breads have little to no gluten in them because they are worked by hand. In North America and now also in England areas, we have heavy machineries manufacturing the dough and purposely agitating the dough to create extra gluten, they actually extract the gluten protein from the dough and then agitate it even more creating extra gluten and then put it all back together again before making products out of it. That’s the biggest reason that we have so many people even regular people without any disease issues like us, who are also intolerable to gluten these days. Our bodies are not designed to handle that much gluten it’s NOT a typical amount you would find from milling your own flour properly and making dough out of it with your hands like we used to do before it was manufactured. Now people with celiac happen to be overly sensitive to it because most of them are actually allergic to the wheat itself, but not everyone is allergic to the wheat so being around gluten doesn’t affect those that aren’t allergic to the wheat itself but allergic to the gluten protein like myself. You may be able to feel the gluten in the air but those that are not allergic to the wheat can still be around it unlike those that are allergic to the wheat and the gluten. Does any of that make sense to anyone that’s unaware? If these products happen to be made by genetically modified sources, then your tolerance is going to be even less and you’ll also have to deal with the issues from that alone on top of the other issues.

        I LOVE gf Jules flour and all of your recipes btw!!! To anyone going on here trying to use other flours and then complain when they don’t turn out, it’s because you’re NOT using the gf Jules flour! These recipes are tailored to that flour ONLY and seriously why would anyone ever want to use anything but this one??!

        • Hi Lacey, I’m so happy to know you can rely on my gfJules Flour for recipes that you’re missing, and please know that lefse is ON MY LIST TO MAKE! I do know that other readers have just used my gfJules Flour in their family recipes with success, so if you’re craving it before I have a chance to write a recipe, go for it! And let me know how it goes!
          As for your other comments, they are so valid. I tried to cover much of this in my article on Gluten Sensitivity and Intolerance as well as the anti-inflammatory diet. Please feel free to share this article with anyone who needs some explaining! 🙂
          ~jules

        • Hello Lacey,
          This is a family lefse recipe from June Martinson. She was a member of our Sons of Norway Lodge in Centralia, WA.
          Lefse
          2 c. riced russet potatoes, 1/2 c. shortening, 1/4 c. sugar, 1 c. buttermilk, 2 c. flour
          After potatoes are cooked and riced, but still warm, add shortening and sugar. Cool. Add all the buttermilk and stir. Add flour and stir. Refrigerate overnight (makes dough easier to roll.) Roll out using pastry cloth-covered board and pin. (Rolls out just like pie dough.) Bake on lefse grill or in oven at 375 degrees until lightly browned. 1 cup of dough makes approximately 5 lefse rounds.