cow - lactose intolerance

Milk Protein Allergy? Lactose Intolerance? Casein-Free? Making Sense of Milk.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Going gluten free is a process. For some, the health benefits are marked and immediate once they stop eating gluten; for others though, it takes time to feel truly better once they have eliminated gluten from their diets altogether. But sometimes removing gluten is not enough.

If you are living gluten free but still don’t feel complete relief from all your gastrointestinal symptoms, chances are you will feel even better when you cut dairy from your diet. Lactose intolerance is often the culprit, but there are other reasons why dairy can be difficult for some to digest.

Lactose Intolerance

For me and a majority of others with celiac disease (“CD”), eliminating dairy from our diets is required, as our bodies no longer produce lactase, the enzyme necessary to break down the milk sugar called lactose. When we eat dairy containing lactose, gastrointestinal discomfort of some kind is a sure result. Many of us with celiac disease developed secondary lactose intolerance/lactase deficiency from injury to our small intestines because of years of undiagnosed CD. Approximately 50% of those with gluten sensitivity also are sensitive to dairy.

Lactose intolerance (primary or secondary) is quite common in the general population as well, though — in fact, most adults are lactase deficient to some degree. An estimated 30-50 million American adults are lactose intolerant, and certain ethnic groups suffer in far higher numbers, including Asians and American Indians who manifest lactose intolerance in a shocking proportion: 80-100 percent of their populations.

goat milkLactose is naturally present in all milk by-products (derived from all mammals like goats, sheep, cows and humans), including butter, cream, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt and ice cream; many other foods and medications contain lactose though, so diligence in reading labels is essential for those avoiding lactose.

Hard cheeses and yogurts actually contain less lactose, and lactose-free (lactase added) milks are more and more common. Many new lactose-free cheese products have been introduced as well, opening up more options for those avoiding lactose.

Casein & Whey

The sugar in milk products is not the problem for everyone though. Some people experience discomfort or a true allergy to the proteins in milk — primarily, casein and whey. (This is a similar condition to those with allergies to soy, as they are nearly always just allergic to the protein in soy, not other by-products like soy lecithin).

Cow

Sorry Bessie! You’re no good for me!

Casein is the curd that forms when milk sours, and whey is the watery portion that is left. Some people are allergic to either whey or casein, but others may be allergic to both; often it is difficult to determine exactly which protein is causing the reaction, and it can be tricky to find food products that list those proteins separately on an ingredient label. Nutritional labels in the U.S. require only that “milk” be identified in the ingredients, not necessarily what part of the milk is used.

In addition to obvious milk products, protein shakes and supplements often contain whey, as it is a quickly absorbed form of protein that some studies have shown helps to build muscle mass and reduce hunger and fat.

Casein is often found in sherbets, chocolate, ice cream, creamed soups and sauces, puddings and other cheeses, and may even be found in processed meats, margarine, artificial flavorings and ghee. Look for foods labeled Kosher pareve, as these will be casein-free.

Milk Protein Allergy

Click to see Alisa Fleming’s popular book “Go Dairy Free.”

Thus, for those with milk protein allergy or otherwise avoiding one milk protein or another, avoiding milk products altogether is the only safe solution. Note: if you are still experiencing gastrointestinal symptoms, even after removing gluten and dairy from your diet, you may want to experiment with eliminating other cross-reactive foods (there are 18 cross-reactive, non-gluten foods that may exacerbate the immune response for gluten sensitive patients). There is a good summary of these foods and the theory of cross-reactivity from Alisa at Go Dairy Free.

For those avoiding dairy altogether for whatever reason, there are fortunately more and more food solutions. I detail these dairy-free substitutions in my book, Free for All Cooking: 150 Easy Gluten-Free, Allergy-Friendly Foods the Whole Family Can Enjoy. And here are some great baking tips for making your recipes dairy-free!

Everything from buttermilk to cream to evaporated milk and ice cream — and every dairy product in between — can be successfully substituted for in your baking. Consult with your doctor to be sure your nutritional needs are being met, and embrace the wonderful dairy-free products and recipes that are available to all of us now!

*For updated new product information from Natural Products Expo West, listen to the free podcast of The Gluten Free Voice Radio Show.

There are some truly amazing vegan and lactose free cheeses available now, so don’t despair! From ricotta to cream cheese to yogurt to artisanal cheeses, mac & cheese and ice cream … you can find just about anything you need now, dairy-free! What are your favorite dairy-free products? Leave a comment and let me know!

miyokos-kitchen-veganmozz-cheese

Some of my favorite dairy-free &/or lactose-free & gluten-free products & ingredients*:

(check ingredients to ensure they suit your particular dietary needs)ricotta-kite-hill

Follow Your Heart® Slices (Gouda; Pepperjack; Provolone)

Miyoko’s Kitchen™ Vegan Mozzarella; Vegan Butter; Artisanal Cheeses

Kite Hill™: almond milk cream cheese, yogurt, ricotta, soft-ripened artisanal cheeses

GO Veggie!® Lactose Free or Vegan shredded cheese, cream cheese, blocks, bars, parmesan, slices

GO Veggie® Vegan Parmesan; Parma! Vegan Parmesan; Follow Your Heart® shredded vegan Parmesan

Field Roast® Vegan Chao Slices

Daiya™ Cheddar and Mozzarella-Style shredded & sliced dairy-free cheese

go veggie cheddarLisanatti Foods® Almond Mozarella or Cheddar-Style Shredded Cheese; Rice Cheeze Sticks

 

Earth Balance® Vegan Buttery Sticks & Soy-Free Buttery Sticks

Earth Balance® Coconut Spread (vegan & soy-free)

 

So Delicious® Coconut Milk Beverage

So Delicious® Almond Milk + Protein

So Delicious® Coconut Yogurt

Bhakti Vegan NogGreen Valley Organics® Lactose Free Yogurt

Follow Your Heart® Cream Cheese Alternative (soy)

Tofutti® Better Than Cream Cheese (soy)

Daiya™ Cream Cheese Style Spread (soy-free)

So Delicious® Coconut or Almond Milk Creamer

So Delicious® Vegan Holiday Nog; Silk® Vegan Nog; Bhakti® Holiday Spiced Nog -vegan

DariFree™ Milk Powder (potato)

Vegan Gourmet-SourCreamSvelte™ Protein Drink (soy)

Orgain® Protein Shake (vegan & gf)

Follow Your Heart® Sour Cream Alternative (soy)

Tofutti® Better Than Sour Cream (soy; non-hydrogenated)

Vegan Gourmet®/Follow Your Heart Sour Cream (soy)So Delicious Minis

Green Valley Organics® Lactose Free Sour Cream

Annie’s® Homegrown Vegan, Gluten Free Mac and Cheese

Healthy Vegan & Gluten Free Mac and Cheese recipe

Dairy Free Dessert Options:

So Delicious Coconut Milk, Cashew Milk, Almond Milk or Soy Milk Ice Cream

Luna & Larry’s® Coconut Bliss ice creams 

So Delicious® Minis

So Delicious® CocoWhip Coconut Whipped CreamCocoWhip

*some items may include affiliate links. If you choose to purchase an item through one of these links, your cost remains the same but I may receive a small portion of the price to use to fund this website. See my full disclosure policy here. As always, all opinions are my own.

 

 

 

Making sense of milk by gfJules. There's more than lactose-intolerance!

Summary
Lactose Intolerance
Article Name
Lactose Intolerance
Description
For some, the health benefits are marked and immediate once they go gluten free; for others though, it takes time to feel truly better once they have stopped eating gluten. And sometimes, removing gluten is not enough. Many find that they have lactose intolerance or need to remove dairy for other reasons.
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

6 thoughts on “Milk Protein Allergy? Lactose Intolerance? Casein-Free? Making Sense of Milk.

  1. First off I want to say awesome blog! I had a quick question that I’d like to ask if you do not mind.
    I was interested to know how you center yourself and clear your head prior to
    writing. I’ve had a tough time clearing my thoughts in getting my
    ideas out there. I do enjoy writing but it just seems like the first 10 to 15 minutes tend to be lost
    simply just trying to figure out how to begin. Any recommendations or hints?
    Kudos!

  2. Pingback: Going Dairy Free – Made Easy with "Go Dairy Free!" - Gluten free recipes - gfJules - with the REAL Jules

  3. Pingback: Gluten AND Dairy-Free Baking - Gluten free recipes - gfJules - with the REAL Jules

  4. Pingback: 40 Day Challenge for Better Health - Gluten free recipes - gfJules - with the REAL Jules

  5. Pingback: New Year New Gluten Free - gfJules

  6. Pingback: Dairy Free Baking Tips - Gluten free recipes - gfJules - with the REAL Jules